Rose Hatala, MD, MSc

Director, Clinical Educator Fellowship

Scholar

Dr. Rose Hatala is a general internist and palliative care physician at St. Paul’s Hospital and a Professor in the Department of Medicine. She completed her clinical training, as well as her MSc focused on educational research, at McMaster University and was clerkship director for internal medicine. She came to UBC in 2003 and was the Associate Program Director for the UBC internal medicine residency program from 2005-2015. Since September 2015, she is the Director of CHES’ Clinical Educator Fellowship. She has extensive front-line experience as a clinical educator for undergraduate and postgraduate learners, in addition to her experience with both in-training and high-stakes assessment methods.

Research Interests

I have had a somewhat peripatetic educational research career. My main interests lie in work-based and high-stakes assessment methods. As a corollary, I have been investigating feedback and entrustment in clinical supervision. In addition, I am interested in clinical reasoning, particularly diagnostic reasoning as this is a key component of an internist’s life and also an important arena in which learners often struggle. I have also spent some time investigating the use of simulation-technology for learner education.

Awards

  • UBC Killam Teaching Prize (2014-15)
  • UBC Faculty of Medicine’s Distinguished Achievement Award for Excellence in Education (2013)

Publication Highlights

Gingerich, A., Daniels, V., Farrell, L., Olsen, S. R., Kennedy, T., & Hatala, R. (2018). Beyond hands‐on and hands‐off: supervisory approaches and entrustment on the inpatient ward. Medical Education, 91(2), 191–13. [SA]

Hatala, R., Sawatsky, A. P., Dudek, N., Ginsburg, S., & Cook, D. A. (2017). In-training evaluation report (ITER) qualitative comments for trainee assessment: A systematic review. Academic Medicine, 92(6), 868-879.

Voyer, S., Cuncic, C., Butler, D. L., MacNeil, K., Watling, C., & Hatala, R. (2016). Investigating conditions for meaningful feedback in the context of an evidence‐based feedback programme. Medical Education, 50(9), 943-954.

Hatala, R., Cook, D.A., Brydges, R., & Hawkins, R. (2015).Constructing a validity argument for the objective structured assessment technical skills (OSATS): A systematic review of validity evidence. Advances in Health Sciences Education Theory and Practice, 1-27.

Cook, DA., Brydges, R., Ginsburg, S., Hatala, R. (2015). A contemporary approach to validity arguments: A practical guide to Kane’s framework. Medical Education, 49(6), 560-575.

Cook, D.A., Hatala, R., Brydges, R., Zendejas, B., Szostek, J.H., Wang, A.J., Erwin, P.J., & Hamstra, S.J. (2011). Technology-enhanced simulation for health professions education: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of the American Medical Association, 306:978-88.